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Results tagged “Mendelsohn”

mendelsohnnnnn.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the last in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

10. Enhance the value of cancer care and reduce costs.

New therapies and medical instruments and devices are major contributors to the rising cost of medical care in the United States. The current payment system incentivizes their use and rewards procedures, tests and treatments rather than rewarding outcomes and efficiency.

mendelsohn99.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the ninth in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

9. Provide access to cancer care for everyone who lives in the United States.

Insurance coverage: Today, more than 47 million Americans are uninsured, and many others are underinsured for major illnesses like cancer.

mendelsohn8.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the eighth in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

8. Encourage new partnerships for drug and device development.

One way to shorten the time for drug and device development is to encourage and reward collaboration among research institutions, and collaboration between academia and industry.

Increasingly, partnerships are required to bring together sufficient expertise and resources needed to confront the complex challenges of treating cancer. There is enormous opportunity here, but many challenges, as well.

Although academic institutions already collaborate, we need to explore new ways to stimulate increased participation in cooperative enterprises.

Mendelsohn1.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the seventh in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

7. Increase funding for research.

After growing by nearly 100% from 1998 to 2002, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget has been in decline the past four years.

Through budget cuts and the effects of inflation, the NCI budget has lost approximately 12% of its purchasing power. Important programs in tobacco control, cancer survivorship and support for interdisciplinary research have had significant cuts.

mendelsohn6.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the sixth in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

6. Accelerate the pace and improve the efficacy of clinical research.

Clinical trials are the essential step in moving research discoveries from the laboratory to patients with cancer. Clinical trials are complicated, lengthy and expensive, and they often require large numbers of patients.

Further steps must be taken to ensure that clinical trials are designed to measure the effects of new agents on the intended genetic and molecular targets, in addition to outcomes and toxicities.

mendelsohn4.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the fifth in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

5. Train providers of cancer care and future researchers.


As baby boomers retire, current shortages in the supply of physicians, nurses and technically trained support staff needed to provide expert care for patients with cancer are projected to increase. This problem will be further exacerbated in three years, when nearly 40 million individuals are added to the insurance rolls.

mendelsohn3.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the fourth in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

4. Address the needs of cancer survivors.

Today there are 11 million Americans who have survived cancer for more than five years -- either free of disease, or in some cases living with their disease under control.

Mendelsohn2.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the third in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

3. Prevent more cancers.

In an ideal world, cancer "care" would begin with risk assessment and counseling of a person when no malignant disease is present. Risk factors include both inherited or acquired genetic abnormalities and other factors that are related to behavior, lifestyle and the environment.

mendelsohn5.jpgLast year, MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the second in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

2. Develop better tests to predict cancer risk and enable earlier detection of cancer.

New technologies similar to those that enable identification of abnormal genes and gene products in cells in a patient's cancer can be used for early detection of cancer (or pre-cancer) in cells or molecules that are shed into the blood or other body fluids.

Changes in the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the blood signify the possible presence of prostate cancer. Most recently, changes in the blood levels of CA-125 have been reported as successful for detecting the presence of ovarian cancer.

Cancer has become the leading world-wide cause of death from disease, according to the World Health Organization.

Mendelsohn.jpgSignificant progress is being made against cancer. The five-year survival rate for all forms of cancer combined has risen to 66%, more than double what it was 50 years ago. And the cancer death rate has been falling by 1% to 2% annually since 1990.

MD Anderson President John Mendelsohn, M.D., is a thought leader on what needs to be done to achieve more progress against cancer. Last year, he proposed 10 steps that can be taken to ensure cancer deaths decrease more rapidly, the ranks of survivors swell, and an even greater number of cancers are prevented in the first place.

This is the first in a series of posts on key actions outlined by Mendelsohn:

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