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turnbillylynn

turnbillylynn

Total Messages 1

Subject:PSA Levels After Radical Prostatectomy

Nearly three years ago, I had a Radical Prostatectomy surgery, and the cancer had spread to the seminal vesicles and was found in one lymph node. I was told that since it had spread, it would eventually return.
Every six months I have a PSA test done and until my last one, it had come back as undetectable. The last one, though still below 1.0 did register. Is that cause for concern? Or is some fluctuation normal.
If there isn't a one question limit, is there a more likely place that the cancer will show up when it returns?


Posted: 22 Jun 2004 02:49 AM
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Ann

Ann

Total Messages 63

Subject:PSA Levels After Radical Prostatectomy

This is very much a cause for concern. After prostatectomy, the PSA should remain undetectable. Any sign of PSA in the blood is an indication of possible cancer recurrence. Possible recurrence sites include the prostate bed, the lymph nodes in the retroperitoneum, and the bone. I would recommend restaging with a CT scan, a bone scan, and possibley even a PET Scan and/or Prostascint scan (with CT correlate). Treatment options in this scenario include hormonal ablation, clinical protocol based therapy (novel therapies being tested for efficacy), or continued observation, although with observation, things will certainly get worse over time (rising PSA, clinical evidence of mets). There is data that hormonal therapy started early in patients with node positive prostate cancer have an improved survival over patients who have hormone therapy started at the time of clinical recurrence. Rarely, radiation may be indicated if the recurrence is localized to the prostate bed, but I think this is unlikely in this case, given that there was seminal vesical and lymph node involvement.

-Christopher Wood, M.D.


Posted: 23 Jun 2004 08:27 AM
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