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DADA

DADA

Total Messages 1

Subject:Nutrition for Chemo Patient

I would like to know how to get a Chemo patient to eat. What is a good food source for someone who just does not want to eat?

Also are their certain foods that a person could eat for healing.

 


Posted: 10 Jan 2008 03:32 PM
Originally Posted: 10 Jan 2008 03:33 PM
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Lhearn

Lhearn

Total Messages 106

Subject:Nutrition for Chemo Patient

A: Unfortunately, there's not a specific type of food or eating program that is guaranteed to restore appetite during chemotherapy. Personalized nutrition recommendations would depend on how limited the individual's food selections are. The most basic advice would be to provide adequate calories and protein to prevent rapid weight changes (more than two pounds per week). For some, this may be as simple as drinking a cup of milk, soymilk or fresh juice with all three of their meals (This would provide up to 450 calories and up to 24 grams of protein per day). For others, appetite loss (and possibly nausea or other side effects) is severe enough to limit their oral intake to only a few bites of food per day. In these extreme cases, the patient should be reminded that without adequate nutrition, their body may not be strong enough to tolerate therapy, leading to possible dose reduction or delay in the chemotherapy schedule. To prevent this, the patient can think of nutrition as part of their medication regimen, taking small "doses" of food and beverage every two hours, regardless of hunger level or appetite. These feedings should include a protein source, and a calorie-containing beverage - Homemade smoothies (suggest blending whey protein powder, fresh fruit and yogurt together) or others mentioned above may be good beverage selections. Commercially prepared nutritional supplement beverages (e.g., Ensure, Boost, Glucerna) are helpful tools for many patients as they are convenient, portable and contain a balance of protein, fat, carbohydrate, vitamins and minerals.

 

Dena Norton


Posted: 15 Jan 2008 10:26 AM
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