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amyb

amyb

Total Messages 1

Subject:No Topic

Hello,

My father had a radical cystecomy in Jan 2009 for bladder cancer.  His type of cancer was originally misdiagnosed until that surgery.  After the surgery, he developed hiccups. They occured all day every day.  He ended up having a tumor in his pelvis.  After chemo (VP16 and Carboplatin) he is now in remission, but 10 months later, he still has the hiccups.  Typically when he lays down, they go away, but as soon as he gets up, they come right back.  He had been on medication for them which did not work.  He had every scan to figure out what was going on, full body and brain.  Each and every scan came back showing no reason for hiccups.  It affects his life.  He has a hard time breathing at times because of them. 

The basic thought of his GI doctor is that these hiccups are a direct result of the surgery.  Is it possible that in this surgery, something occured that either affected the way his body handles gas, or did something to the diaphram or the nerves that cause it to contract.  Is there anything else we can do or anyplace we can go for help.  We just want his hiccups to go away so he can get back to his life.

Thank you


Posted: 11 Feb 2010 09:53 AM
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Lhearn

Lhearn

Total Messages 104

Subject:No Topic

A Gastroenterologist would be the best person to talk to about this problem.  Hiccups arise from a wide variety of conditions and persistent hiccups can interfere with daily activities and cause sleep disturbance and fatigue. Initial treatment usually includes physical maneuvers, while intractable hiccups are often treated with drugs such as chlorpromazine or metoclopramide. Other options for treatment include hypnosis and acupuncture. Some individuals  with disabling hiccups that do not respond to other more conservative treatment have undergone  phrenic nerve surgery.


Posted: 12 Feb 2010 03:20 PM
Originally Posted: 12 Feb 2010 03:21 PM
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