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Help patients in need at MD Anderson, in the Northeast

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help_patients_in_need_and_donate_blood.JPGThe MD Anderson Blood Bank is grateful that it has an adequate supply of blood and platelets for our patients for the coming few days.

Not all blood banks are so fortunate.

Blood banks in the Northeast that provide blood products to cancer centers and hospitals affected by Hurricane Sandy are running low. Because power is spotty, transportation difficult and residents focused on rebuilding, local blood drives have been cancelled and it could be some time before they gear up again.

The MD Anderson Blood Bank has not been called upon to assist with blood supplies elsewhere yet. But if our blood bank can maintain its own reserve for the coming months, it will not need to locate blood products from other regions which may be running short.

Honor someone you love
If you would like to honor a patient or donate in thanksgiving for a survivor, please donate blood or platelets through MD Anderson's Blood Bank. Or if you prefer, you can wait a few weeks --  closer to the Thanksgiving or Christmas holidays--  and give. 

It will be during the holidays that MD Anderson's supply will be feeling the effects of the storm in the Northeast, and your donation will mean even more. The Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays typically are slow donation times since many people are busy with travel and other activities. But the need continues, regardless of the calendar or the weather.

MD Anderson is the largest user of blood products in the world, and keeping the necessary supply on hand is vital for our patients undergoing surgery or bone marrow transplants, as well as those getting chemotherapy or trying to keep up their counts.  

You can donate at MD Anderson Blood Donor Center:
  • 2555 Holly Hall near Almeda Road (Parking is free and accessible.)
For information about donating, scheduling a blood drive or if you plan to give platelets, please

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